BBSRC and DBT funded research study

Animal suffering tropical theileriosis, the disease causes death or a significant loss in productivity

Animal suffering tropical theileriosis, the disease causes death or a significant loss in productivity

Epidemiology of tick borne disease, host resistance and novel pathogen vaccines

This project funded by the BBSRC and the Department of Biotechnology (India) as part of the Farmed Animal Disease and Health programme (FADH) x commenced on October 1st 2014. The UK project team involves Profs Rowland Kao, Brian Shiels, Andy Tait and Drs Stephen Larcombe and William Weir from BAHCM, and Prof Liz Glass from the Roslin Institute, Edinburgh. The India team involves Nagpur Veterinary College, Madras Veterinary College and Veterinary College & Research Institute, Namakkal. The lead investigator of the Indian team is Dr Sunil Kolte (Nagpur Veterinary College).

Tick borne infections cause major diseases that result in huge losses in livestock productivity over much of the world. In India major losses are generated from transmission of Babesia and Theileria parasites, with Theileria infection, in particular, making it almost impossible to farm more productive European breeds of cattle. There are three main aims of the project

  1. generate information on the molecular epidemiology of tick borne parasites in selected regions of India to develop a predictive model of disease control
  2. investigate pathogen resistance in native breeds of cattle at the level of molecular genetics
  3. determine the impact of antigen diversity on the inclusion of molecules in a vaccine to block disease transmission.

All three objectives are designed to provide greater knowledge of tick borne disease in India that can help inform novel strategies for control. An initial project meeting took place in November 2014 at Nagpur Veterinary College. Detailed plans to meet the project objectives were made and potential problems discussed.